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styleforumnet:

Friday casual (and high rise pants worn well).

styleforumnet:

Friday casual (and high rise pants worn well).

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The Beauty of Japanese Fabrics

dieworkwear:

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Like many style enthusiasts, I like clothes with unusual details. I just often prefer mine to be hidden. So, sport coats with poacher’s pockets, boots with unseen straps, and pants with an unnecessary number of buttons. The newest project is a leather jacket with a special Japanese lining. I got the idea from Greg at No Man Walks Alone, who was working on a similar project last year until it fell through. Since I won’t be able to get one from him, I’ve been thinking about buying a jacket elsewhere, and then taking it to an alterations tailor to have the lining replaced. Ideally, the jacket would be a café racer, black and austere, constructed from a heavy cowhide, and accented with silver zips. It’d look tough and mean, but also have a special lining inside that no one would see. The only question is what fabric to use.

At the top of the list is boro, a Japanese folk fabric originally used by thrifty farmers and fishermen. Here, a large piece of cloth is repaired with scraps and rags over the course of a few family generations. The result is something that looks like a Japanese version of an American patchwork quilt, where hundreds of indigo patches are pieced together with roughhewn stitches. I imagine those various shades of blue would look fantastic next to black leather.

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voxsart:

1933.
When the legends began.

voxsart:

1933.

When the legends began.

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lnsee:

Liverano double-breasted blazer in blue

lnsee:

Liverano double-breasted blazer in blue

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styleforumnet:

Yes, I like green plaid.  What of it?
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gothamred:

Green Day

In La Vera Sartoria Napoletana / Ascot Chang / Drake’s of London / Simonnot Godard / Salvatore Ambrosi / Carmina Shoemaker

gothamred:

Green Day

In La Vera Sartoria Napoletana / Ascot Chang / Drake’s of London / Simonnot Godard / Salvatore Ambrosi / Carmina Shoemaker

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voxsart:

Tweed ‘66.
Lee Marvin, 1966.

voxsart:

Tweed ‘66.

Lee Marvin, 1966.

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(Source: fuckyeahbond)

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suitsandshirts:

Pierce Brosnan wearing a Brioni suit

suitsandshirts:

Pierce Brosnan wearing a Brioni suit

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ivorytowerstyle:

Brioni has put up a video of its 1952 men’s fashion show, which was the first of its kind. A few things I noticed:
Whereas on runways today, models plod forward with a death stare into nowhere, likely drugged into blissful ignorance of any of the earthlings that surround them, Brioni’s Angelo Vittucci works the crowd. He shakes hands, he smiles and laughs, he even lets a lady in the front row get a little handsy with his overcoat (at 2:27).
Most of the audience is women. I don’t know if they’re buyers or media types or what. I wish I knew more about who was in the audience and why.
I have heard people refer to the jackets Brioni made at this time as “short” but they don’t seem so in the video, at least by today’s standards.
Jackets are three-button, worn with the top two buttoned. Lapels are fairly narrow. They look quite “trim” but not tight.
Anyway, the video is worth a look.

ivorytowerstyle:

Brioni has put up a video of its 1952 men’s fashion show, which was the first of its kind. A few things I noticed:

  • Whereas on runways today, models plod forward with a death stare into nowhere, likely drugged into blissful ignorance of any of the earthlings that surround them, Brioni’s Angelo Vittucci works the crowd. He shakes hands, he smiles and laughs, he even lets a lady in the front row get a little handsy with his overcoat (at 2:27).
  • Most of the audience is women. I don’t know if they’re buyers or media types or what. I wish I knew more about who was in the audience and why.
  • I have heard people refer to the jackets Brioni made at this time as “short” but they don’t seem so in the video, at least by today’s standards.
  • Jackets are three-button, worn with the top two buttoned. Lapels are fairly narrow. They look quite “trim” but not tight.

Anyway, the video is worth a look.